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Maksim Samsonov
Maksim Samsonov

Traditional Ecological Knowledge And Natural Re...


This volume highlights the different ways of seeing and engaging with the natural world and underscores the need to acknowledge and honor the ways that indigenous peoples have done so for generations.




Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Natural Re...


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Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) has been recognized within indigenous communities for millennia; however, traditional ecological knowledge has received growing attention within the western science (WS) paradigm over the past twenty-five years. Federal agencies, national organizations, and university programs dedicated to natural resource management are beginning to realize the critical need to incorporate different ways of knowing into their natural resource management decisions. Furthermore, Native American tribes on a national scale are assuming greater leadership through self-determination and self-governance and continue to serve as models for sustainable forestry and resource management by incorporating components such as traditional ecological knowledge, community support for integrated resource management plans, and a holistic, dedicated, long-term vision for the environment. This paper reviews recent literature on the integration of TEK and WS and proposes a dualism theory for conservation in the twenty-first century where TEK and WS are applied equally in natural resource management.


She Hoagland recently completed her PhD in forestry at Northern Arizona University and is working with the Mescalero Apache Indian tribe to investigate the effects of forest treatments on the Mexican spotted owl. Much of her current research focuses on applying traditional ecological knowledge to forest and wildlife management. She served as the co-Point of Contact for tribal relations for the Southern Research Station of the US Forest Service. Serra joined the SRS and the Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center (EFETAC) in 2011 after finishing her Master's degree at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at UC Santa Barbara (UCSB). She received her Bachelor's in Ecology from California Poly, San Luis Obispo. She is Laguna Pueblo from the village of Paguate and remains active in the following Native American organizations: the American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES), the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society and the Intertribal Timber Council (ITC). Through the ITC, Serra served as a graduate student observer for 2 years on the Indian Forest Management Assessment Team (IFMAT), which was the third decadal national assessment on the status of Indian forests and forest management.


Sustainable management of natural resources plays a critical role in poverty alleviation and overall socio-economic development. North East (NE) India is blessed as a biodiversity hotspot, being also home to around 150 ethnic tribes with diverse ethical, cultural and traditional beliefs, endorsing the region as a cultural paradise rich in natural resources and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Conversely, the severely constrained nature of TEK, has juxtaposed TEK practices and sustainable natural resources management (NRM) in this review. Deliberating on the broader perspectives of TEK and ensuing practices, we have identified twelve sustainable development goals (SDGs) which are directly correlated to the TEK and practices of NE region. This review has meticulously detailed TEK and practices that can help in achieving various sustainable development targets of different SDGs in a more comprehensive and eco-friendly manner. Houde's manifestation to differentiate each element of TEK and practices present in the NE region of the country, such as traditional farming and irrigation systems, sacred groves, and cultural belief systems of different tribes, have been systematically analyzed and documented for each of the eight states of this region. The benefits accrued modern practices related to NRM are correlated with TEK, or adaptive empirical knowledge system. Indigenous agricultural systems, watershed management, biodiversity conservation, and ethnomedicinal therapeutic systems in NE India formed a vital part of the review. However, rapid urbanization, industrialization, and deforestation warrant an urgent need to systematically collate, document, analyze, and conserve the TEK of the indigenous communities of NE India.


  • Go to Review Article

  • Abstract

  • Introduction

  • The Importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledgein Climate Change Adaptation

  • TEK in a Climate Change Context

  • Traditional Ecological Knowledge and NaturalResource Management

  • The Use of TEK in Seasonal Forecasting

  • Integrating TEK with Scientific Knowledge

  • National and International Interest in TEK

  • Conclusion

  • Recommendation

  • References

The Importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledgein Climate Change AdaptationTEK is the knowledge acquired by indigenous and localpeoples over many hundreds of years through direct or indirectcontact with the environment. The detailed knowledge ofplants, animals, and natural phenomena, the development anduse of appropriate technologies for hunting, fishing, trapping,agriculture, forestry and a holistic knowledge are included. TEKrepresents the information necessary for cultural survival whichaccumulated over many years and site specific [6].


  • Go to Review Article

  • Abstract

  • Introduction

  • The Importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledgein Climate Change Adaptation

  • TEK in a Climate Change Context

  • Traditional Ecological Knowledge and NaturalResource Management

  • The Use of TEK in Seasonal Forecasting

  • Integrating TEK with Scientific Knowledge

  • National and International Interest in TEK

  • Conclusion

  • Recommendation

  • References

Traditional Ecological Knowledge and NaturalResource ManagementTraditional Ecological Knowledge plays a significant role innatural resource management. TEK has the potential to forecastthe near long-term climate condition which affect the localcommunities. This potential of TEK enable us to conserve thenatural resources which is important for the survival of indigenouspeople. For instance, TEK has contribution in water harvesting,watershed management, forest resource management, wetlandprotection and other natural resource that are important for thepersistence of human across the world. The interaction of naturalresource with Indigenous groups have historically depend on TEKresources [10]. Some of the practices that reflect the importanceof TEK in natural resource management include the protectionof wildlife habitat and ecologically valuable forest components[11]. However, during the last few decades, these practices andtraditions have become a source of wisdom about sustainableresource use and environmental conservation. Traditionalecological knowledge is basis for developing adaptationand natural resource management strategies in response toenvironmental and other forms of change. In the United States,there are examples of indigenous groups that have included TEKguidelines in contemporary resource management plans for theirtribes and communities [1].


  • Go to Review Article

  • Abstract

  • Introduction

  • The Importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledgein Climate Change Adaptation

  • TEK in a Climate Change Context

  • Traditional Ecological Knowledge and NaturalResource Management

  • The Use of TEK in Seasonal Forecasting

  • Integrating TEK with Scientific Knowledge

  • National and International Interest in TEK

  • Conclusion

  • Recommendation

  • References

References Vinyeta K (2012) A Synthesis of Literature on Traditional EcologicalKnowledge and Climate Change. Offat I M, Miriam C (2015) Integrating Indigenous KnowledgeSystems into Climate Change Interpretation: Perspectives Relevant toZimbabwe. Greener Journal of Educational Research 5(2): 027-036. Kuma V (2014) Role of Indigenous Knowledge in Climate ChangeAdaptation Strategies: A Study with Special Reference to North-Western India. J Geogr Nat Disast 4:131. Parrotta JA, Mauro Agnoletti (2012) Chapter13: Traditional Forest-Related Knowledgeand Climate Change. Traditional Forest-Related Knowledge: SustainingCommunities, Ecosystems and Biocultural Diversity. World Forests 12.In: Parrotta JA, Trosper RL (Eds.), Springer Science Business MediaB.V., USA. Finn S, Mose Herne, Dorothy Castille (2017) The Value of TraditionalEcological Knowledge for the Environmental Health Sciences andBiomedical Research. Environ Health Perspect 125(8): 085006. Drew A (2005) Use of traditional ecological knowledge in marineconservation. Conserve Biol 19(4): 1286-1293. Salick J, Ross N (2009) Traditional peoples and climate change. GlobalEnvironmental Change 19(2): 137-139. Nabhan GP (2010) Perspectives in Ethnobiology: Ethnophenology andClimate Change. Journal of Ethnobiology 30(1): 1-4. Johnston BR (2012) Water, cultural diversity, and global environmentalchange: Emerging trends, sustainable futures? United NationsEducational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), ParisKnowledge for the Environmental Health Sciences and BiomedicalResearch. Berkes F (2008) Sacred Ecology. New York: Routledge, USA. Wells Gail (2011) Native American ForestryCombines Traditional Wisdom with ModernScience. Solutions 2: 107-114. Charles R Menzies (2006) Traditional Ecological Knowledge andNatural Resource Management; includes bibliographical referencesand index. British Broadcasting Corporation Weather Center (2006) WeatherBasics - Fog. King K (2005) A Case for the Moon. Berkes F, Berkes MK (2009) Ecological Complexity, Fuzzy Logic, andHolism in Indigenous Knowledge. Futures 41(1): 6-12. Popova U (2014) Conservation, Traditional Knowledge, and IndigenousPeoples. American Behavioral Scientist 58(1): 197-214. Mason L, White G, Morishima G, Alvarado E, Andrew L, et al. (2012)Listening and learning from traditional knowledge and Westernscience: a dialogue on contemporary challenges of forest health andwildfire. Journal of Forestry 110(4): 187-193. Alexander C, Bynum N, Johnson E, King U, Mustonen T, et al. (2011)Linking Indigenous and Scientific Knowledge of Climate Change.BioScience 61(6): 477- 484. Ray B, Kawagley AO (2005) Indigenous Knowledge Systems and AlaskaNative Ways of Knowing. Anthropology and Education Quarterl 36(1):8-23. Lertzman DA (2010) Best of two worlds: Traditional ecologicalknowledge and Western science in ecosystem-based management. BCJournal of Ecosystems and Management 10(3): 104-126. 041b061a72


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